Product Branding Exercise

This task engaged students in the application of consumer theory to product branding, and simulated the experience of running focus groups. Students used theories of exposure, attention, and perception to make strategic, defensible choices in the development of a branding campaign for a new product. Afterward, each team pitched their product and campaign to the class, and ran focus groups on another team's campaign.

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Consumer Memory Exercise

This task illustrated the distinction between episodic and semantic product memories. Students selected a product with which they have had a significant and lasting personal experience, and recounted (1) impressions derived from their experiences with the product (episodic) and (2) product knowledge not derived from personal experiences (semantic). Afterward, they compared their product memories with those of their classmates. 
  
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Purchase Decisions Exercise

This task simulated the experience of conducting in-depth interviews, and allowed students to weigh the reach and credibility of various information sources discussed in the textbook (marketing vs. non-marketing sources, mass media vs. personal delivery). Students took turns interviewing one another about the sources of information they seek out when considering the purchase of consumer electronics. Afterward, we discussed the interview results as a class.

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Social Media Strategy Exercise

This task encouraged students to analyze marketing strategy while being cognizant of both consumer and corporate goals. Students read the Harvard Business Review article 'Social Strategies that Work' in preparation for class. Each group was tasked with devising a social media strategy that would offer consumers a solution to a given 'social challenge' (connecting/interacting with strangers/friends). In addition, this media strategy should plausibly increase spending or customer retention, or lead to the acquisition of new customers.

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Debate: Consumer Choice

This task engaged students in the application of textbook material to a debate on the pros and cons of product line segmentation. Students watched two TED talks in preparation for class: Malcolm Gladwell's pro-segmentation talk, and Barry Schwartz's anti-segmentation talk. Afterward, they were assigned to teams, each defending the argument of one speaker with supporting evidence from the course readings.

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